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More Than 16 Million Households Receive Cost of Living Council Tax Rebate

Around 90% of eligible households have received the government’s £150 council tax rebate to help with the cost of living


  • Around 9 out of 10 of eligible households have received £150 cost of living rebate

  • Anyone yet to receive the rebate can make a claim to local authority

  • Rebate part of £37 billion of government support to tackle cost of living crisis


Around 90% of eligible households have received the government’s £150 council tax rebate to help with the cost of living.


Figures published today show 16.6 million households in England, 86% of those eligible, were handed payments by the end of July – meaning the actual number of those who have received the rebate by now will be even higher as councils continue to pay it out.


Today’s figures show a total of £2.5 billion has gone to households in council tax bands A to D under the scheme, an increase of more than £500 million on the previous month.


All councils in England have begun making these payments and have payment processes in place for people who do not pay by direct debit. DLUHC will continue to drive progress with councils to pay households as soon as possible where they have not already done so.


Households have until the end of September to claim the £150 payment, which does not have to be paid back. Anyone who is yet to receive their rebate is urged to check their local council website for more information and make a claim.


However, recognising the importance of the rebate in helping those most in need with rising costs, the government urges councils to do everything they can to encourage the remaining households to claim their rebate to ensure as many eligible households as possible get the money that they are owed.


An extra £144 million has also be given to councils to provide discretionary support to any household in financial need due to rising energy bills, including transient groups and people on low incomes in council tax bands E to H.


Levelling Up Secretary Greg Clark said:

I’m pleased to see further progress in paying the council tax rebate out to the millions of households who are eligible to receive it.
We want to make sure that those most in need receive the support that they are entitled to help households with the cost of living. This is why I am urging everyone to check their eligibility to receive the rebate and contact their councils if they have not.

The rebate is part of £37 billion of government support being targeted at those most in need to help with the cost of living. This includes at least £1,200 of extra support for millions of the most vulnerable households this year, with all domestic electricity customers receiving at least £400 towards their bills.


The rebate is available to most households living in council tax bands A to D on 1 April. This includes those who receive Local Council Tax Support, even if their council tax bill for the year is less than £150.


Anyone who thinks they are eligible but does not have a direct debit and has not received a payment or details of how to make a claim, should visit their local council’s website for more information.


Since announcing the rebate in April, the government has provided £28 million for councils to set up software and recruit staff and will top this up as necessary to cover all reasonable delivery costs. Councils have been given a host of options to make payments quickly and securely including bank account transfers, council tax account credits or a voucher-based system.


Local authorities must also make arrangements for those who cannot access the internet.

If households do not know who their local council is, they can find their website through entering their postcode.


See more information about government support on the cost of living.


Further Information

All households in England are placed by the Valuation Office Agency into 1 of 8 council tax bands, ranging from band A to band H.


Though local authorities may be making their best efforts, certain transient groups such as student households and those who move frequently may be impossible to contact and will have not left forwarding addresses.