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Discussions with Mexican Officials on Migration at the Department of State


Discussions with Mexican Officials on Migration at the Department of State
Discussions with Mexican Officials on Migration at the Department of State

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken hosted Mexican Foreign Secretary Alicia Bárcena yesterday at the Department of State to follow up on migration commitments made on December 27 in response to the invitation of President Andrés Manuel López Obrador.


Secretary of Homeland Security Alejandro Mayorkas, White House Homeland Security Advisor Liz Sherwood-Randall, Deputy Attorney General Lisa Monaco, and USAID Deputy Administrator Isobel Coleman joined Secretary Blinken for the meeting.


Foreign Secretary Bárcena was joined by Defense Secretary Luis Crescencio Sandoval González; Secretary of the Navy Admiral Rafael Ojeda Duran; Secretary of Public Security Rosa Icela Rodríguez Velazquez; Mexican Ambassador to the United States Esteban Moctezuma Barragán; Félix Arturo Medina, Undersecretary of Human Rights, Population and Migration, SEGOB; Roberto Velasco, Head of the Unit for North America, SRE;  Commissioner for the National Migration Institute Francisco Garduño Yaez; and Alejandro Celorio, Legal Counselor, SRE.


During the meeting, Secretary Blinken and the U.S. delegation noted that our coordinated efforts with Mexico are demonstrating positive results at our shared border.  They discussed the positive impact of efforts to increase migration controls on bus and train routes, crack down on criminal smuggling networks, and scale up repatriations for those who do not have a legal basis to remain in our countries.


Secretary Blinken highlighted the peaceful transfer of power in Guatemala as one of the most significant developments in the region since the last meeting.  In close collaboration with the Government of Mexico, the United States stands ready to support the people of Guatemala and their new government on a wide range of issues including economic development and hemispheric migration management.


U.S. and Mexican officials also discussed their bilateral efforts to counter human smuggling and arms trafficking.  In addition, they reaffirmed the importance of further expanding lawful pathways and work opportunities, including between our two countries.


Migration is a hemispheric challenge.  The United States is committed to work hand in hand with Mexico and countries across the region to address the root causes of migration and advance economic opportunities in the spirit of Los Angeles Declaration for Migration and Protection.


The two governments committed to continue their strong cooperation on migration, including in senior leader discussions on the margins of the Trilateral Fentanyl Committee meeting in Mexico City in early February.

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