UN Truce Expiration in Yemen



The United States expresses its deep concern that the UN-mediated truce in Yemen expired on October 2 without the parties reaching agreement to extend it. Yemeni men, women, and children have experienced the tangible benefits provided by the truce: the longest period of calm since the war began, a dramatic reduction in civilian casualties, four times more fuel flowing into Yemen’s northern ports, and commercial flights enabling over 25,000 Yemenis to seek medical care and reunite with loved ones abroad. Much more is certainly needed, and the expanded truce proposal presented by the UN would provide just that: providing salaries to tens of thousands of civil servants who have not been paid in years, opening roads across the country, expanding international flights, and easing the clearance process for fuel ships entering Hudaydah port. Most importantly, the UN proposal would enable the launch of negotiations on a comprehensive ceasefire and an inclusive, Yemeni-led political process that would durably end the war.


The United States welcomes the support from the Republic of Yemen Government for the UN’s expanded truce proposal, as well as the strong support from countries across the region, the UN Security Council, and other international partners. The overwhelming consensus in support of the UN-mediated truce is a testament to its potential to put Yemen on the path to peace and recovery. The United States urges the Houthis to continue negotiations in good faith and work with the UN to come to an agreement to extend the truce and keep Yemen on the path to peace. We urge all the parties to exercise restraint during this sensitive time. The United States underscores the unacceptability of Houthi rhetoric threatening commercial shipping and oil companies operating in the region.


The truce represents the best opportunity Yemenis have had for peace in years. The choice before the parties is simple: peace and a brighter future for Yemen, or a return to pointless destruction and suffering that will further fracture and isolate a country already on the brink. The only way to truly ease the suffering of Yemenis is through negotiation, not war.